Monthly Archives: March 2012

Akashi Kaikyo Bridge “The world’s longest suspension bridge. “

“The world’s longest suspension bridge. “ Vital Statistics: Location: Kobe and Awaji-shima, Japan Completion Date: 1998 Cost: $4.3 billion Length: 12,828 feet Type: Suspension Purpose: Roadway Materials: Steel Longest Single Span: 6,527 feet Engineer(s): Honshu-Shikoku Bridge Authority In 1998, Japanese engineers stretched the limits of bridge engineering with the completion of the Akashi Kaikyo Bridge.… Read More »

A Bridge Built to Sway When the Earth Shakes

SAN FRANCISCO — Venture deep inside the new skyway of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, and it becomes clear that the bridge’s engineers have planned for the long term. Courtesy NYTimes At intervals inside the elevated roadway’s box girders — which have the closed-in feel of a submarine, if a submarine were made of concrete… Read More »

The Falkirk Wheel – the world’s first and only rotating boat lift

The Falkirk Wheel was completed in 2002 as part of the Millennium Link project. The project cost £84.5 million and had the objective of restoring the ability to navigate across Scotland on the Forth & Clyde and the Union Canal. The Falkirk Wheel is the world’s first and only rotating boat lift. How it functions?… Read More »

Potentially Game-Changing Advances in Energy Materials

(From ScienceDaily) The findings of the three-phase project was published in its capstone Innovation Impact Report. The study was launched in February 2010 when TMS convened an Energy Materials Blue Ribbon Panel, consisting of 21 thought leaders in materials science and engineering.

Hidden strength of a spider’s web( @ MIT news)

The silk that spiders use to build their webs, trap their prey and dangle from your ceiling is one of the strongest materials known. But it turns out it’s not simply the material’s exceptional strength that makes spider webs so resilient; it’s the material’s unusual combination of strength and stretchiness — silk’s characteristic way of… Read More »

A Robot can build it for you

(Extract From Science Daily) Armies of Robots are coming to crawl up the towers and skyscrapers to make repairs;In near future, human beings don’t have to, leading to less safety concerns, of course speed,economy results. Hod Lipson, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and of computing and information science at Cornell University,as his… Read More »